80%animal 20%man
thebrainscoop:

shadowskittle:

Timelapse for the two-faced calfs skull being cleaned by the beetles.
I just thought it was the coolest thing ever so I tried to make a gif.
(x)

nom noM NOM NOM NOM 

thebrainscoop:

shadowskittle:

Timelapse for the two-faced calfs skull being cleaned by the beetles.

I just thought it was the coolest thing ever so I tried to make a gif.

(x)

nom noM NOM NOM NOM 

magicalnaturetour:

Scottish wildlife photographer David Yarrow even escaped an up close meeting with a lioness on the prairie
Self-taught 47-year-old has produced almost 90 black and white pictures of wildlife in harsh landscapes
Among the images are two baby penguins helping each other climb an icy slope in Snow Hill, Antarctica
Also included in new book Encounter is a pair of polar bears confronting each other in Manitoba, Canada
All photos by David Yarrow…Article By ROBERT DEX via MailOnline read more…

malformalady:

The markings adopted by the Toposa tribe of South Sudan are among the most intricate and involve serried rows of dotted lines.
Photo credit: Eric Lafforgue
More on my Blogspot

malformalady:

The markings adopted by the Toposa tribe of South Sudan are among the most intricate and involve serried rows of dotted lines.

Photo credit: Eric Lafforgue

More on my Blogspot

thejunglenook:


Pangolin foetus.
Source
Those teeny tiny little claws. :3

thejunglenook:

Pangolin foetus.

Source

Those teeny tiny little claws. :3

spectacularuniverse:

I’ve seen this photograph very frequently on tumblr and Facebook, always with the simple caption, “Ghost Heart”. What exactly is a ghost heart?
More than 3,200 people are on the waiting list for a heart transplant in the United States. Some won’t survive the wait. Last year, 340 died before a new heart was found.The solution: Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this— first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts - for years.The process is called decellularization and it is a tissue engineering technique designed to strip out the cells from a donor organ, leaving nothing but connective tissue that used to hold the cells in place. This scaffold of connective tissue - called a “ghost organ” for its pale and almost translucent appearance - can then be reseeded with a patient’s own cells, with the goal of regenerating an organ that can be transplanted into the patient without fear of tissue rejection.This ghost heart is ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart - one that won’t be rejected - can be grown.(Source)

spectacularuniverse:

I’ve seen this photograph very frequently on tumblr and Facebook, always with the simple caption, “Ghost Heart”. What exactly is a ghost heart?

More than 3,200 people are on the waiting list for a heart transplant in the United States. Some won’t survive the wait. Last year, 340 died before a new heart was found.

The solution: Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.

Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.

Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this— first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts - for years.

The process is called decellularization and it is a tissue engineering technique designed to strip out the cells from a donor organ, leaving nothing but connective tissue that used to hold the cells in place. 

This scaffold of connective tissue - called a “ghost organ” for its pale and almost translucent appearance - can then be reseeded with a patient’s own cells, with the goal of regenerating an organ that can be transplanted into the patient without fear of tissue rejection.

This ghost heart is ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart - one that won’t be rejected - can be grown.


(Source)

magicalnaturetour:

Portrait of a sleeping cub by Tambako the Jaguar on Flickr.
malformalady:

Skull made from fingernail clippings

malformalady:

Skull made from fingernail clippings